The Land of Eden

Have you seen the Land of Eden? No, it’s not in Mesopotamia. At least not William Byrd’s Eden. Byrd’s original Land of Eden was in North Carolina. Continue reading

Minchiate and Miniature Maps

A previous post described several miniature maps of Carolina, each measuring four inches or less. We have one more to add to the list. Are you familiar with Minchiate? Continue reading

Looking for great Virginia maps?

Two auctions in November will feature a superb selection of maps de-accessioned from Colonial Williamsburg. Earlier this year, CWF acquired the incomparable William C. Wooldridge Collection of (mostly) Virginia maps, filling several gaps in CWF’s own remarkable map collection. However, the purchase has also resulted in acquisition of duplicate copies of some maps; these are being offered to the public via auction. Many of these maps are quite rare, of great historical importance, or both.

A selection of 60+ maps will be offered on Saturday, November 11, 2017, at Brunk Auctions, 117 Tunnel Road, Asheville, NC 28805. Their catalog is on line. Enter Williamsburg in the keyword search window and click the “Go” button. The CWF maps are lots 1058 – 1120. The Saturday morning auction begins at 9 a.m. with lot 897.

There will also be a small selection of CWF maps in a December 5, 2017, auction at Swann Galleries in New York City. The catalog will likely be on line 3-4 weeks before the auction. Check their web site for updates.

Happy bidding!

p.s. A selection of nearly 60 maps will be offered on Friday, November 10, 2017, at Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates, 2177 Green Valley Lane, Mt. Crawford, VA 22841. The catalog will be posted on their web site on or about November 1. I believe these are from a private collection, not from CWF.

283 M. Survey’d, give or take a few

John Mitchell’s monumental 1755 map of North America has a curious annotation in the North Carolina Piedmont. About 15 miles southwest of present-day Salisbury, one sees “283 M. Survey’d”. So what 283 miles were surveyed?

283 mile marker of the Granville Line survey on John Mitchell’s 1755 map of North America.

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Westward Ho! Roanoke, the Map, and X Marks the Spot

Westward Ho! Roanoke, the Map, and X Marks the Spot is a free symposium to be held 27-29 October 2017, on Roanoke Island, NC. The sympsium will focus on new information on Sir Walter Raleigh’s  Roanoke Island colonies & the John White-Thomas Harriot Virginea Pars Map—with all its secret symbols. Continue reading

Early North Carolina school maps

It’s August, which means most of us are thinking about the start of school, even those of us who aren’t in school as students or teachers (think traffic). Let’s take a look at a few very scarce 19th Century published school maps of North Carolina. Continue reading

Cape Fear map mug

The June 9, 1868, issue of The Daily Journal (Wilmington, NC) includes an interesting story on page 3, pertaining to a map of Cape Fear on a mug.

The Daily Journal, Wilmington, NC, 9 June 1868, Tuesday, page 3:

A RELIC.– We have before us a most interesting relic of the past, surrounded with peculiar importance because of its interest being of a strictly local character. This relic is an old English earthen mug, equal in capacity to a quart measure, bearing upon its outside face, “a map of Cape Fear River and its vicinity from the Frying Pan Shoals to Wilmington; by actual survey.” This mug was given to the late Mr. Junius Davis, of Brunswick County, 10 years ago by one Miss Faulkes, an old maiden lady, whose family had owned it for 70 years previous to that time. There was also in the possession of the Faulkes family another mug, similar in shape and appearance, bearing a map showing the river above Wilmington, which was unfortunately broken. Continue reading

Circles on the map, Circle Towns or Round Towns

Circle Towns: One of my childhood map memories is the distinctively circular shape of Shelby, NC, on the state’s official highway map:

Shelby is a circle on NC highway map

Shelby on 1970 NC Highway map, courtesy of North Carolina State Archives

Shelby was not an anomaly; there were quite a few North Carolina towns whose limits were originally prescribed by a perfect circle. Continue reading

What’s in a name? Conetoe, NC

Conetoe: A small but wonderful community in eastern Edgecombe County, about 6 miles southeast of Tarboro.

First, let’s get the pronunciation correct; it’s cuh-NEAT-uh, according to the NC Gazetteer. Don’t even think about pronouncing it Cone Toe. Ok, I’ll confess, I can’t help but think “Cone Toe” when I see Conetoe. It sure would help if they would revert to the original spelling. What is the source of this town’s unusual name? Continue reading

NC cartobibliography: Anthony Finley

The 1820s saw the maturation of cartographic publishing in the United States, heralding the “Golden Age of American Cartography”.1  Atlas publishers in the first years of this era included, Carey & Lea, Fielding Lucas, Henry Tanner, and Anthony Finley.

1824 map of North Carolina published by Anthony Finley

Image courtesy of David Rumsey

The above map of North Carolina was published in the 1824 first edition of Anthony Finley’s A New General Atlas Comprising a Complete Set of MapsContinue reading

James T. Paterson – Confederate dentist and map publisher

This map of NC/SC, with a curious imprint, “Published by James T. Paterson”, contains no date or place of publication.

James T. Paterson 1865 map of North and South Carolina

Image courtesy of the State Archives, Raleigh, NC.

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Occacock from Actual Survey

A small map published in late 1795 holds a special place of distinction in North Carolina’s cartographic history. Occacock from Actual Survey. By I. Price 1795 was the very first map drawn, engraved, and printed in North Carolina.*

Occacock from Actual Survey by Jonathan Price Continue reading