Nathaniel Batts: Buried at sea, but not originally

Nathaniel Batts: Buried at sea, but not originally

Nathaniel Batts may not have been the first permanent European settler in North Carolina (there is vague evidence that he was not), but he was undoubtedly one of the earliest and best documented. Where is his grave site? Continue reading

What’s in a name? Surveyors Ferry, NC

Catching my attention recently on the map, “Carte des Etats-Unis: Provinces Meridionales”, was Surveyors Ferry across the Pasquotank River. SurveyorsFerry1

Who was/were the alleged surveyor(s)?  Continue reading

What’s in a name? Murder in North Carolina

MURDER in NORTH CAROLINA!

Several 18th century maps depict Murder in North Carolina. Continue reading

Price-Strother: a final letter

NOTE: The information provided here is supplementary to “Reflecting on the Price-Strother Map of North Carolina: An Uncommon Exercise for an Uncommon Map”, a newly published history of this magnificent map in the Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts.

Jonathan Price’s debt to the State transferred to the

University of North Carolina Board of Trustees and

Price’s stirring letter to the Trustees.

(If you don’t read anything else, at the very least, skip to the end and read Price’s letter.)

Continue reading

Price-Strother map in contemporary letters

NOTE: The information provided here is supplementary to “Reflecting on the Price-Strother Map of North Carolina: An Uncommon Exercise for an Uncommon Map”, a newly published history of this magnificent map in the Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts.

Contemporary letters referencing the Price-Strother map

Aaron Burr was most renowned for being Vice President during Jefferson’s first term, and while in that office, killing Alexander Hamilton in a duel. Continue reading

Price-Strother map of NC: Reviews and Ads

 

NOTE: The information provided here is supplementary to “Reflecting on the Price-Strother Map of North Carolina: An Uncommon Exercise for an Uncommon Map”, a newly published history of this magnificent map in the Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts

 

Contemporary reviews and advertisements for

the Price-Strother map of North Carolina

 

The earliest review located thus far was published in The Monthly Anthology, and Boston Review in April 1808.[1] Was it an original review, or was it a reprint of an earlier review? Continue reading

Price-Strother map legal documents

NOTE: The information provided here is supplementary to “Reflecting on the Price-Strother Map of North Carolina: An Uncommon Exercise for an Uncommon Map”, a newly published history of this magnificent map in the Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts

 

General Assembly Petitions, Committee Reports, and Resolutions Pertaining to the 1808 Price-Strother map of North Carolina: 1790-1799.

These records, listed chronologically, were obtained from manuscript documents in the North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh, NC, and from published journals of the House and Senate. Continue reading

Map Wars IV: The Minister Strikes Back

In earlier blog posts, we’ve discussed the resurrection of the plates for the 1833 MacRae-Brazier map and their use by Wellington Williams to publish a “new” map of North Carolina in 1854. The following episode involved their use by an unknown publisher (J.H. French?) for a bizarre map that turned out to be a publisher’s mock up for the map that is the subject of today’s post. What does a minister have to do with all of this?

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Map Wars III: A disturbance in the force…caused by a bizarre map of NC

In a previous post, we discussed Wellington Williams’s publication in 1854 of a (not so) new map of North Carolina, printed from the resurrected copper plates of the 1833 MacRae-Brazier map. Those plates had more lives than a cat. Their next reincarnation resulted in one of the strangest North Carolina maps ever published. That is the topic of this North Carolina Map Blog post. Continue reading

Cartographic winds of change

We’ll return to the Map Wars series in a few weeks. In the meantime, please enjoy this tidbit.  Fielding Lucas, Jr., was one of the great American map publishers of the early 19th century. Not only did he compile and publish his own atlases, he also drew maps for other publishers. One example of the latter is a Geographical, Historical, And Statistical Map Of North Carolina, published in 1822-1827 atlases by Carey & Lea, shown here…
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History and Reestablishment of the NC-SC Boundary: June 23

Gary W. Thompson, Chairman of the North Carolina Boundary Commission, will be speaking at the Friends of the Archives annual meeting in Raleigh on Monday, June 23, 2014 at 1:30 p.m. The presentation will be in the State Library Building Auditorium, 109 E. Jones Street, Raleigh, NC. Mr. Thompson’s presentation will provide an overview of the history of the North Carolina-South Carolina boundary that determined how North Carolina got its shape. Information will be provided on the research and survey work performed to complete the recent task of reestablishing the boundary. After the program, a selection of historical boundary maps will  be on exhibit in the State Archives’ Reading Room. Want to see the “official broadside” for this event? Click here.

UPDATE!  For those of us who couldn’t make it, many thanks to the NC Archives for making it available on their YouTube channel.

Map Wars: Episode II – A “new” NC wall map.

There are, of course, numerous examples of maps whose publication history far outlived their accuracy from either a physical or political geographic perspective. One of the best examples from North Carolina is the 1833 MacRae-Brazier map.

Braziergif

1833 MacRae-Brazier map of North Carolina

Note: Analogous to the Star Wars movies, we’re starting in the middle of the story. We’ll eventually circle around to Episode I, the story of the original MacRae-Brazier map. The fact that I’m starting in the middle of the story is what prompted the post title; this mid 19th century commercial cartographic competition did not involve light sabres or other weaponry. We now return you to your regularly scheduled blog post… Continue reading