Anniversary of the Mouzon-Delarochette map of the Carolinas

Happy Birthday, “Mouzon” Map! Today marks the 240th anniversary of the publication of a map that was not made by Henry Mouzon, Jr.  One of the most recognized colonial era maps of North Carolina is the so-called Mouzon map, first published in May 1775. It is a beautifully executed map, entitled An Accurate Map of … Continue reading “Anniversary of the Mouzon-Delarochette map of the Carolinas”

Henry Mouzon, Jr., or Henry Mouzon, Jr. – which one made the map?

As will be shown in a future blog post, Henry Mouzon, Jr. receives undue credit for the map entitled An Accurate Map of North and South Carolina…the whole from Actual Surveys by Henry Mouzon and Others. So does Henry Mouzon, Jr.  Say what?

No love for Carte de la Caroline

Cartographic historians and collectors of 18th Century maps of what is now Virginia and the Carolinas love “wow” maps, such as the Churton-Collet map of North Carolina and the Fry-Jefferson map of Virginia. A few maps, such as Carte de la Caroline Meridionale et Septentrionale et de la Virginie, receive no love at all and … Continue reading “No love for Carte de la Caroline”

History Derailed, or, the libel of James Cook.

Eighteenth Century South Carolina surveyor James Cook has been dead for over 200 years. Let’s make believe he’s still living and still surveying. What else would he be doing?  He’d be suing several late 20th and early 21st century writers and publishers for libel. His case would be a slam dunk. Let’s examine the evidence … Continue reading “History Derailed, or, the libel of James Cook.”

Map Societies’ meetings in October

Saturday, October 10, 2015, at the Wilson Library on the UNC-CH campus. William P. Cumming Map Society North Carolina Collection and the Rare Book Collection 9:30 am — Meet, greet, coffee 10 am – “America’s First ‘Coloring Book’: Theodor de Bry’s 1590 edition of Thomas Harriot’s Briefe & True Report from the New-Found Land of Virginia”, … Continue reading “Map Societies’ meetings in October”

WPC Map Society meeting October 10, 2015

Saturday, October 10, 2015, at the Wilson Library on the UNC-CH campus. 9:30 am — Meet, greet, coffee 10 am – “America’s First ‘Coloring Book’: Theodor de Bry’s 1590 edition of Thomas Harriot’s Briefe & True Report from the New-Found Land of Virginia”, by Larry Tise 11 am – “Deed Books as Maps: Origins of the 1770 … Continue reading “WPC Map Society meeting October 10, 2015”

Nathaniel Batts: Buried at sea, but not originally

Nathaniel Batts: Buried at sea, but not originally Nathaniel Batts may not have been the first permanent European settler in North Carolina (there is vague evidence that he was not), but he was undoubtedly one of the earliest and best documented. Where is his grave site?

What’s in a name? Green’s Path

The East Coast Greenway organization’s vision is …a green travel corridor [that] will provide cyclists, walkers, and other muscle-powered modes of transportation with a low-impact way to explore the eastern seaboard. Over 300 years ago, there was a trail in eastern North Carolina that undoubtedly required muscle power. It was literally a green way or, … Continue reading “What’s in a name? Green’s Path”

Saturday Map Seminar at MESDA, November 9

We hope you’ll join other cartophiles for a day devoted to the discussion of colonial era maps. The event will be at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Old Salem, Winston-Salem, NC, on Saturday, November 9, 2013 (MESDA on Google Maps). The event will include lectures and an opportunity to see some extraordinarily … Continue reading “Saturday Map Seminar at MESDA, November 9”

You survey mine and I’ll survey yours

In 1767, portions of the South Carolina frontier were surveyed by a party of North Carolinians, led by none other than the North Carolina Governor himself, William Tryon.  A year or two later, a substantial portion of the frontier of North Carolina was surveyed by James Cook, a South Carolinian, at the request of his … Continue reading “You survey mine and I’ll survey yours”