James Wimble: 1738 map of NC

In 1738, James Wimble’s chart of the coast of North Carolina was published in London. The lengthy title: To His Grace Thomas Hollis Pelham Duke of Newcastle Principal Secretary of State and one of His Majesties most Honourable Privy Council, &c. This Chart of his Majesties Province of North Carolina With a full & exact description of the Sea-coast, Latitudes, Capes, remarkable Inlets, Bars, Channels, Rivers, Creeks, Shoals, depth of Water, Ebbing & Flowing of the Tides, the generally Winds Setting of the Currents, Counties, Precincts, Towns, Plantations, and leading Marks, with directions for all the navigable Inlets; are Carefully laid down and humbly dedicated, by Your Grace’s most humble, most dutiful, & most Obedient Servant, James Wimble. Continue reading “James Wimble: 1738 map of NC”

A bad good authority?

In his 1854 report on the survey of Beaufort Harbor in North Carolina, Lieutenant James Maffitt stated the following:

…Wimble’s chart published in 1737 (one hundred and seventeen years ago,) gives eighteen feet as the depth on the bar at low tide. It is also stated on good authority that Lawson’s chart published in 1718 coincides with Wimble’s in the depth at low water.

John Lawson died in 1711. Furthermore, neither the original English version of Lawson’s map of Carolina, published in 1709, nor subsequent German and Swiss derivatives, show any soundings in the vicinity of Beaufort. I have been unable to locate a Lawson published map or manuscript map that shows soundings at the inlet to Beaufort, nor any map published circa 1718 that might have been misattributed to Lawson. The not-so-“good authority” is not named by Maffitt, so one is impeded in trying to investigate from that angle. Edward Moseley’s map of North Carolina, published in 1733, contains an inset of “Port Beaufort”. Perhaps that is the map to which the “good authority” was referring. If anyone has a better suggestion, please let us know via the “What’s on your mind?” comment box. Thanks.

Le Provincie Meridionali degli Stati Uniti x 4

…or a whole lotta Botta!

Four separate, but nearly identical, maps of the Carolinas, engraved and printed in Italy in the 19th century, are completely devoid of the letter “W”.   These four maps have an identical title, Le Provincie Meridionali degli Stati Uniti.  Continue reading “Le Provincie Meridionali degli Stati Uniti x 4”

Octagonal towns – better than circles

Octagonal towns.  A previous post discussed the abundance of circle towns in North Carolina (and throughout the South) and the various reasons behind this geometric town limit. The impracticality of a circular boundary, from a surveyor’s perspective, was also mentioned. What’s the solution to keeping the circular benefits in a way that would be practical to the surveyorr? The octagonal town, of course! Continue reading “Octagonal towns – better than circles”

MESDA Map Seminar – NEW DATE

This conference has been rescheduled for September 17-18, 2021. 

Cartography & Culture: Mapping the Early American South, a MESDA Map Seminar, will be held at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, NC, on September 17-18, 2021. The organizers have created an outstanding program. Further details on the program and registration are available here: https://mesda.org/program/mesda-fall-seminar/ . This program has been generously sponsored by Mr. & Mrs. Frank H. Holcomb of Houston, TX. I hope to see you there!

The cartographic wanderings of Carolana

On 30 October 1629, King Charles I issued a grant to Sir Robert Heath, his attorney general, for all the land in North America between 31° and 36° north latitude. This land was designated Carolana, i.e. “land of Charles.” During the next 150 years, Carolana made sporadic and wandering appearances on maps. Continue reading “The cartographic wanderings of Carolana”

C. M. Miller: North Carolina’s preeminent county map maker

C.M. Miller authored at least eleven North Carolina county maps (nine separate counties) during the early 20th Century. Who was this forgotten cartographer, and which counties did he map? Continue reading “C. M. Miller: North Carolina’s preeminent county map maker”

No love for Carte de la Caroline

Cartographic historians and collectors of 18th Century maps of what is now Virginia and the Carolinas love “wow” maps, such as the Churton-Collet map of North Carolina and the Fry-Jefferson map of Virginia. A few maps, such as Carte de la Caroline Meridionale et Septentrionale et de la Virginie, receive no love at all and are essentially ignored. Why is that? Continue reading “No love for Carte de la Caroline”

John Lawson’s virtually unknown published map of “Ocacock Inlet”

Renowned British map dealer, scholar, and author Philip Burden made an exciting discovery at the Admiralty Library in Portsmouth, UK. Burden discovered four previously unrecorded small charts of locations on the east coast of North America, bound within an extremely rare small atlas by Philip Lea. Continue reading “John Lawson’s virtually unknown published map of “Ocacock Inlet””

Treasures of the Moravian Archives – E. A. Vogler’s 1863 Map of Forsyth County

Hidden in Plain Sight – some remarkable maps of Wachovia/Forsyth County/Winston-Salem

A few months ago, I attended a lecture at the Moravian Archives in Winston-Salem. While there, I had the opportunity to see several manuscript and printed maps of Forsyth County displayed on the walls of the Archives. Continue reading “Treasures of the Moravian Archives – E. A. Vogler’s 1863 Map of Forsyth County”

Sir Walter Raleigh Conference, Sept. 6-8, 2018

Raleigh 400

A Conference on Sir Walter Raleigh
Four Hundred Years After His Death

On Thursday, September 6 through Saturday, September 8, 2018, fourteen leading scholars will share their knowledge and current research on the life and impact of Sir Walter Raleigh (1554?-1618). Raleigh 400: A Conference on Sir Walter Raleigh Four Hundred Years After His Death will be held at the Wilson Special Collections Library, part of the University Libraries on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The conference is open to the public but will be geared toward a scholarly audience. Advance registration is required. Admission is free, with the exception of the dinner and talk on Friday evening, September 7.

Link to program schedule.

Link to registration.

Link to hotel accommodations.

The conference is sponsored by the Wilson Special Collections Library’s North Carolina Collection and Rare Book Collection and the Program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Questions: Please call the North Carolina Collection at 919-962-1172.