Map Societies’ meetings in October

Saturday, October 10, 2015, at the Wilson Library on the UNC-CH campus.

William P. Cumming Map Society

North Carolina Collection

and the Rare Book Collection

9:30 am — Meet, greet, coffee

10 am – “America’s First ‘Coloring Book’: Theodor de Bry’s 1590 edition of Thomas Harriot’s Briefe & True Report from the New-Found Land of Virginia”, by Larry Tise

11 am – “Deed Books as Maps: Origins of the 1770 Churton-Collet Map”, by Mark Chilton

12 noon– Lunch*

1 pm – “Carolina Comparative Cartography – Mouzon and Others“, by Jay Lester

2 pm – Event ends.

If you plan to attend, please make that known to Alison Barnett via email ammurray@email.unc.edu so that we’ll know how many chairs to set up. Before the conference, and/or during lunch, you are invited to view the exhibit, Chronicles of Empire: Spain in the Americas, where De Bry volumes and fine cartographic materials will be on display.

*LUNCH: The most convenient option, if it can be arranged, would be to purchase a box lunch to be provided at the Wilson Library. If you desire this option, contact Alison Barnett at the Wilson Library to express your interest (ammurray@email.unc.edu). Other options include various on campus facilities, some very close to the Wilson Library (http://files.dining.unc.edu/Hours/Fall_2015_Hours.pdf). Restaurants on Franklin Street are another option, though the relatively short lunch break may render that option less viable.

Monday, October 19, 2015 – Williamsburg, VA 

The Williamsburg Map Circle

WMC will meet at 5 p.m. in their usual venue, the Jamestown-Yorktown Room at Williamsburg Landing. Margaret Beck Pritchard, Curator of Prints, Maps, and Wallpaper at Colonial Williamsburg, will talk about the evolution of the CW map collection. She is the author of “Degrees of Latitude,” treating selected maps from the collection (now sold out and out of print). The Colonial Williamsburg map collection began as an element of the furnishings of the historic houses, but during Margaret’s tenure has become a comprehensive assemblage of the most important printed (and some manuscript) maps of the era. She will tell us how it happened. Additional information from Ted Edwards.