Treasures of the Moravian Archives – E. A. Vogler’s 1863 Map of Forsyth County

Hidden in Plain Sight – some remarkable maps of Wachovia/Forsyth County/Winston-Salem

A few months ago, I attended a lecture at the Moravian Archives in Winston-Salem. While there, I had the opportunity to see several manuscript and printed maps of Forsyth County displayed on the walls of the Archives. Continue reading

Sir Walter Raleigh Conference, Sept. 6-8, 2018

Raleigh 400

A Conference on Sir Walter Raleigh
Four Hundred Years After His Death

On Thursday, September 6 through Saturday, September 8, 2018, fourteen leading scholars will share their knowledge and current research on the life and impact of Sir Walter Raleigh (1554?-1618). Raleigh 400: A Conference on Sir Walter Raleigh Four Hundred Years After His Death will be held at the Wilson Special Collections Library, part of the University Libraries on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The conference is open to the public but will be geared toward a scholarly audience. Advance registration is required. Admission is free, with the exception of the dinner and talk on Friday evening, September 7.

Link to program schedule.

Link to registration.

Link to hotel accommodations.

The conference is sponsored by the Wilson Special Collections Library’s North Carolina Collection and Rare Book Collection and the Program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Questions: Please call the North Carolina Collection at 919-962-1172.

History Derailed, or, the libel of James Cook.

Eighteenth Century South Carolina surveyor James Cook has been dead for over 200 years. Let’s make believe he’s still living and still surveying. What else would he be doing?  He’d be suing several late 20th and early 21st century writers and publishers for libel. His case would be a slam dunk. Let’s examine the evidence of libel and then the facts. Continue reading

Daniel Dunbibin, Nicholas Pocock, and Trees

One noticeable feature on a select few Carolina coastal charts published during the last half of the 18th century is a row of trees along the Grand Strand, a section of coast now dominated by high rise hotels and condos. Who “planted” these trees? Daniel Dunbibin or Nicholas Pocock?

18th Century charts by Nicholas Pocock, George Le Rouge, and John Norman each show a line of trees along the coast of present-day Myrtle Beach.

Image credits: 1770 Pocock image courtesy of Boston Rare Maps. 1777 Le Rouge image courtesy of North Carolina Collection at UNC-CH. 1794 Norman image courtesy of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library.

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Ould Virginia, one of many newe names that didn’t stick.

When the English shifted their colonization efforts north from Roanoke Island to the James River and Chesapeake Bay, they took the name “Virginia” with them. So what did they call North Carolina once they absconded with its original Virginia moniker? Ould Virginia, of course.

Theodor de Bry’s 1590 published engraving of John White’s map of Virginia was the first printed map focused specifically on what is now North Carolina. The second such map was published by John Smith in his 1624 book, The Generall Historie of Virginia, New-England, and the Summer Isles... Continue reading

The Land of Eden

Have you seen the Land of Eden? No, it’s not in Mesopotamia. At least not William Byrd’s Eden. Byrd’s original Land of Eden was in North Carolina. Continue reading

Minchiate and Miniature Maps

A previous post described several miniature maps of Carolina, each measuring four inches or less. We have one more to add to the list. Are you familiar with Minchiate? Continue reading

Looking for great Virginia maps?

Two auctions in November will feature a superb selection of maps de-accessioned from Colonial Williamsburg. Earlier this year, CWF acquired the incomparable William C. Wooldridge Collection of (mostly) Virginia maps, filling several gaps in CWF’s own remarkable map collection. However, the purchase has also resulted in acquisition of duplicate copies of some maps; these are being offered to the public via auction. Many of these maps are quite rare, of great historical importance, or both.

A selection of 60+ maps will be offered on Saturday, November 11, 2017, at Brunk Auctions, 117 Tunnel Road, Asheville, NC 28805. Their catalog is on line. Enter Williamsburg in the keyword search window and click the “Go” button. The CWF maps are lots 1058 – 1120. The Saturday morning auction begins at 9 a.m. with lot 897.

There will also be a small selection of CWF maps in a December 5, 2017, auction at Swann Galleries in New York City. The catalog will likely be on line 3-4 weeks before the auction. Check their web site for updates.

Happy bidding!

p.s. A selection of nearly 60 maps will be offered on Friday, November 10, 2017, at Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates, 2177 Green Valley Lane, Mt. Crawford, VA 22841. The catalog will be posted on their web site on or about November 1. I believe these are from a private collection, not from CWF.

283 M. Survey’d, give or take a few

John Mitchell’s monumental 1755 map of North America has a curious annotation in the North Carolina Piedmont. About 15 miles southwest of present-day Salisbury, one sees “283 M. Survey’d”. So what 283 miles were surveyed?

283 mile marker of the Granville Line survey on John Mitchell’s 1755 map of North America.

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Westward Ho! Roanoke, the Map, and X Marks the Spot

Westward Ho! Roanoke, the Map, and X Marks the Spot is a free symposium to be held 27-29 October 2017, on Roanoke Island, NC. The sympsium will focus on new information on Sir Walter Raleigh’s  Roanoke Island colonies & the John White-Thomas Harriot Virginea Pars Map—with all its secret symbols. Continue reading

Early North Carolina school maps

It’s August, which means most of us are thinking about the start of school, even those of us who aren’t in school as students or teachers (think traffic). Let’s take a look at a few very scarce 19th Century published school maps of North Carolina. Continue reading

Cape Fear map mug

The June 9, 1868, issue of The Daily Journal (Wilmington, NC) includes an interesting story on page 3, pertaining to a map of Cape Fear on a mug.

The Daily Journal, Wilmington, NC, 9 June 1868, Tuesday, page 3:

A RELIC.– We have before us a most interesting relic of the past, surrounded with peculiar importance because of its interest being of a strictly local character. This relic is an old English earthen mug, equal in capacity to a quart measure, bearing upon its outside face, “a map of Cape Fear River and its vicinity from the Frying Pan Shoals to Wilmington; by actual survey.” This mug was given to the late Mr. Junius Davis, of Brunswick County, 10 years ago by one Miss Faulkes, an old maiden lady, whose family had owned it for 70 years previous to that time. There was also in the possession of the Faulkes family another mug, similar in shape and appearance, bearing a map showing the river above Wilmington, which was unfortunately broken. Continue reading