What map is this? Burr or Greenleaf?

In “What map is this?” Part 1 and Part 2, cartobibliographic resources useful in identification of North Carolina maps were discussed. In this segment, we’ll provide all the nitty-gritty details needed to correctly identify and date a series of 19th century atlas maps of “North & South Carolina” (ignoring the awful grammar inherent to that map title).
In the early 1830s, following up on the success of his 1829 atlas of the state of New York, David H. Burr began work on a world atlas. The first edition of this Universal Atlas was published in 1835. According to David Rumsey:

“Ristow [American Maps and Mapmakers] states that Burr completed only eight of the 63 maps by 1832 and was then unable to complete the project because of his appointment to the U.S. Post Office as topographer; the atlas was completed by Illman and Pilbrow and issued in 1835. Burr is given credit on the title page, and the entire group of maps is in his ‘style’ so we can assume he played at least a supervisory role in the production of the remaining maps.”

The 1835 atlas was published by D.S. Stone, N. York, and printed by Cammeyer & Clark, N.Y. The NC/SC map contained therein has an 1834 Illman and Pilbrow copyright imprint. The second edition of Burr’s atlas was published in 1836 by Wm. Hall & Co. The NC/SC map contained therein has an 1836 Illman and Pilbrow copyright imprint. Subsequent issues of the Universal Atlas in 1840, 1842, 1843, 1844, 1848, and 1849 were attributed to Jeremiah Greenleaf.  As shown below, the NC/SC map (either Burr or Greenleaf versions) can be found handcolored by state or by county.

N&S Carolina, from 1835 atlas by David Burr. Image courtesy of the David Rumsey Collection

N&S Carolina, from 1835 atlas by David Burr. Image courtesy of the David Rumsey Collection

N&S Carolina, from 1840 atlas by Jeremiah Greenleaf. Image courtesy of the David Rumsey Collection

N&S Carolina, from 1840 atlas by Jeremiah Greenleaf. Image courtesy of the David Rumsey Collection

 

The 1834 and 1836 copyright imprints are obviously helpful for identifying copies from the 1835 and 1836 atlases, respectively. The NC/SC map in the Greenleaf atlases shows no copyright imprint or any other attribution. What other features can be used for proper dating and cataloging of this map? I’m glad you asked. There are at least 4 states of the map corresponding to atlases published in the following years:

  • First state – 1835
  • Second state – 1836
  • Third state – 1840
  • Fourth state – 1842, 1843, 1844, 1848

The following document provides all the particulars (for a wider view, open in a separate tab/window via this link).

Caveats: The determination of these four states of the map is based on the copyright imprints and a review of the North Carolina portion of the map. Someone with a keen interest in South Carolina maps should accept the challenge of determining if there are any changes in South Carolina that affect the numbering of states of this map. Additionally, there is an 1849 edition of this atlas in a private collection in Vermont. The NC/SC map in that atlas has not been examined. Corrections and/or additions are greatly appreciated. Please use the “What’s on your mind?” comment box below.

References:

Excellent biographical information on David Burr can be found on Barry Ruderman’s web site, specifically, on this web page.

 

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