What’s in a name? Surveyors Ferry, NC

Catching my attention recently on the map, “Carte des Etats-Unis: Provinces Meridionales”, was Surveyors Ferry across the Pasquotank River. SurveyorsFerry1

Who was/were the alleged surveyor(s)?  Continue reading

Murder in North Carolina! What’s in a name?

 

Several 18th century maps depict Murder in North Carolina. Continue reading

Price-Strother map legal documents

NOTE: The information provided here is supplementary to “Reflecting on the Price-Strother Map of North Carolina: An Uncommon Exercise for an Uncommon Map”, a  history of this magnificent map published in the Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts. There are four NC Map Blog supplements to the MESDA article:

Price-Strother map legal documents (this page, scroll down)

Price-Strother map of NC: reviews and advertisements

Price-Strother map in contemporary letters

Price-Strother: a final letter

 

General Assembly Petitions, Committee Reports, and Resolutions Pertaining to the 1808 Price-Strother map of North Carolina: 1790-1799.

These records, listed chronologically, were obtained from manuscript documents in the North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh, NC, and from published journals of the House and Senate. Continue reading

Another La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt Map?

© North Carolina Map Blog.

 

Although neither rare nor of great historical significance, a certain style United States regional map, centered on the Carolinas, captured my attention a few years ago after observing the remarkable frequency with which many of these maps were attributed to non-existent translations of a work by François-Alexandre-Frédéric, duke de La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt. These maps cover the Carolinas and portions of surrounding states. Continue reading

Re-Stating Cook’s 1773 Map of the Province of South Carolina

In June 1766, the South Carolina legislature published the following solicitation:

ANY Person or Persons capable and inclinable to make an accurate MAP of the Province from actual Survey, are desired to give in their Proposals as speedily as possible.

Answering that call were… Continue reading

What’s in a name? Green’s Path

The East Coast Greenway organization’s vision is …a green travel corridor [that] will provide cyclists, walkers, and other muscle-powered modes of transportation with a low-impact way to explore the eastern seaboard. Over 300 years ago, there was a trail in eastern North Carolina that undoubtedly required muscle power. It was literally a green way or, more specifically, the Green Path, as illustrated here:

Detail from the 1775 Mouzon map, courtesy of the David Rumsey Collection

Detail from the 1775 Mouzon map, courtesy of the David Rumsey Collection

Continue reading

You survey mine and I’ll survey yours

In 1767, portions of the South Carolina frontier were surveyed by a party of North Carolinians, led by none other than the North Carolina Governor himself, William Tryon.  A year or two later, a substantial portion of the frontier of North Carolina was surveyed by James Cook, a South Carolinian, at the request of his government. Why couldn’t each province survey its own lands? Continue reading

Henry Mouzon, Jr., or Henry Mouzon, Jr. – which one made the map?

As will be shown in a future blog post, Henry Mouzon, Jr. receives undue credit for the map entitled An Accurate Map of North and South Carolina…the whole from Actual Surveys by Henry Mouzon and Others. So does Henry Mouzon, Jr.  Say what? Continue reading

Re-Stating the 1770 Churton-Collet map of North Carolina

This beautiful late colonial (1770) map of North Carolina, by William Churton and John Collet, is one of our great cartographic treasures. I have been unable to find a description of the different states of the Churton-Collet map, and have assumed that there was only one state of:
A compleat map of North-Carolina from an actual survey / by Capt’n Collet, Governor of Fort Johnston ; engraved by I. Bayly. Continue reading

Why is there a bump on our boundary?

Have you ever noticed the peculiar step off in the boundary between North Carolina and Virginia at the northwest corner of Gates County?

Bump

Ever wonder why it is there? Continue reading

Holiday surprise! A “Discovery” of several great maps.

Several remarkably rare maps were recently “discovered” in Winston-Salem, NC, at the Moravian Archives. Of course, the custodians of these maps have always known of their existence. However, the cartographic community has been largely unaware of these particular maps as evidenced by the absence of their documentation in the usual reference works. For example… Continue reading

What’s in a name? Freydeck, NC

In a previous post, we talked about one of the oldest place names still in use in North Carolina, Lockwood Folly. Today, we’ll talk about a place name which appeared and vanished in the 18th century.  Freydeck made a sudden appearance west of the Blue Ridge (in current day Ashe County) on several English and French maps of North America published in 1755, including the monumental map by John Mitchell,  A Map of the British and French Dominions in North America with the Roads, Distances…

 

Detail from John Mitchell’s map, showing Freydeck on the New River in NC.

What is a Freydeck?

Continue reading