What’s in a name? Bellin “Reckoned” wrong in Carolina.

Determining the origins of unusual place names found on early maps of Carolina is a fun, and perhaps nerdy, exercise. Some, such as Lockwood Folly, have interesting, and sometimes obscure, historical origins. Others, like Murder and Surveyor’s Ferry, have their origin in copying errors by cartographers and/or engravers. What about Reckoned, on the Catawba River at the current site of Fort Mill, SC? Continue reading

Carey’s Pocket Atlas Maps of North Carolina

The Pocket Atlas Maps of North Carolina published by Mathew Carey, 1796-1820.

Mathew Carey published his first “Carey’s American Pocket Atlas” in 1796. The engraved plate for this map of North Carolina was used in later issues of Carey’s pocket atlas in 1801, 1802, 1805, 1806, and 1810. Updates to the plate appeared with the 1801 and 1805 editions of Carey’s pocket atlas. Continue reading

Anniversary of the Mouzon-Delarochette map of the Carolinas

Happy Birthday, “Mouzon” Map!

Today marks the 240th anniversary of the publication of a map that was not made by Henry Mouzon, Jr.  One of the most recognized colonial era maps of North Carolina is the so-called Mouzon map, first published in May 1775. It is a beautifully executed map, entitled An Accurate Map of North and South Carolina with their Indian frontiers, Shewing in a distinct manner [all sorts of neat stuff], the whole from actual surveys by Henry Mouzon and Others. Continue reading

234th Anniversary of the Battle of Guilford Courthouse

March 15, 2015, marks the 234th anniversary of the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, one of the most pivotal engagements of the Revolutionary War. A series of lectures pertaining to the event is scheduled during the evenings this week, and reenactments and other activities are scheduled for the anniversary weekend, March 14-15. For details of these events, please visit the Guilford Battleground Company. What contemporary maps of the battle survive? Continue reading

George Washington’s TripTik®

George Washington’s upcoming birthday and a recently spotted highway historical marker pertaining to his Southern Tour in 1791 prompted a search for contemporary (to Washington) maps showing the President’s route through North Carolina. What did we find? Continue reading

Re-stating John Henry’s 1770 Map of Virginia

Discovery of a previously unrecorded proof state

of John Henry’s 1770 Map of Virginia

One of the rarest colonial era maps of Virginia is A new and accurate map of Virginia wherein most of the counties are laid down from actual surveys…by John Henry, published in London in February, 1770, by Thomas Jefferys. Previously published cartobibliographies and descriptions of this map have reported only one known state of the map. Continue reading

Nathaniel Batts: Buried at sea, but not originally

Nathaniel Batts: Buried at sea, but not originally

Nathaniel Batts may not have been the first permanent European settler in North Carolina (there is vague evidence that he was not), but he was undoubtedly one of the earliest and best documented. Where is his grave site? Continue reading

What’s in a name? Surveyors Ferry, NC

Catching my attention recently on the map, “Carte des Etats-Unis: Provinces Meridionales”, was Surveyors Ferry across the Pasquotank River. SurveyorsFerry1

Who was/were the alleged surveyor(s)?  Continue reading

Murder in North Carolina! What’s in a name?

 

Several 18th century maps depict Murder in North Carolina. Continue reading

Price-Strother map legal documents

NOTE: The information provided here is supplementary to “Reflecting on the Price-Strother Map of North Carolina: An Uncommon Exercise for an Uncommon Map”, a  history of this magnificent map published in the Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts. There are four NC Map Blog supplements to the MESDA article:

Price-Strother map legal documents (this page, scroll down)

Price-Strother map of NC: reviews and advertisements

Price-Strother map in contemporary letters

Price-Strother: a final letter

 

General Assembly Petitions, Committee Reports, and Resolutions Pertaining to the 1808 Price-Strother map of North Carolina: 1790-1799.

These records, listed chronologically, were obtained from manuscript documents in the North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh, NC, and from published journals of the House and Senate. Continue reading

Another La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt Map?

© North Carolina Map Blog.

 

Although neither rare nor of great historical significance, a certain style United States regional map, centered on the Carolinas, captured my attention a few years ago after observing the remarkable frequency with which many of these maps were attributed to non-existent translations of a work by François-Alexandre-Frédéric, duke de La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt. These maps cover the Carolinas and portions of surrounding states. Continue reading

Re-Stating Cook’s 1773 Map of the Province of South Carolina

In June 1766, the South Carolina legislature published the following solicitation:

ANY Person or Persons capable and inclinable to make an accurate MAP of the Province from actual Survey, are desired to give in their Proposals as speedily as possible.

Answering that call were… Continue reading