Miniature maps of Carolina

The old axiom, “good things come in small packages”, certainly holds true in maps. There are some miniature maps of Carolina that are adorable. Let’s take a look at a few maps of the Carolinas that measure no more than four inches. Continue reading

Nathaniel Batts: Buried at sea, but not originally

Nathaniel Batts: Buried at sea, but not originally

Nathaniel Batts may not have been the first permanent European settler in North Carolina (there is vague evidence that he was not), but he was undoubtedly one of the earliest and best documented. Where is his grave site? Continue reading

Re-prioritizing Blome’s Description

There are 3 issues of the 1672 first edition of A Description of the Island of Jamaica; with the other Isles and Territories in America…published by Richard Blome, varying in the seller listed on the title page, as follows: Continue reading

Re-stating Blome’s A Generall Mapp of Carolina

A Generall Mapp of Carolina Describeing its Sea Coast and Rivers, London Printed for Ric. Blome, was published in A Description of the Island of Jamaica: With the other Isles and Territories in America, by Richard Blome (Burden, Plate 420). The title page in the first edition of the book is dated 1672. Continue reading

What’s in a name? Green’s Path

The East Coast Greenway organization’s vision is …a green travel corridor [that] will provide cyclists, walkers, and other muscle-powered modes of transportation with a low-impact way to explore the eastern seaboard. Over 300 years ago, there was a trail in eastern North Carolina that undoubtedly required muscle power. It was literally a green way or, more specifically, the Green Path, as illustrated here:

Detail from the 1775 Mouzon map, courtesy of the David Rumsey Collection

Detail from the 1775 Mouzon map, courtesy of the David Rumsey Collection

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NC’s Pacific Coast – the Sea of Verrazzano

So you live in North Carolina and want to go to the beach. Do you head east or west? It depends on if you want to go to the State’s coast on the Atlantic or Pacific. Of course, North Carolina does not have a Pacific Coast. That wasn’t always the case. Continue reading

What’s in a name? Lockwood Folly

Few North Carolina place names are older than Lockwood Folly, and the origins of few place names are more mysterious. It appears to have made its debut as “Look Wood Folly” on the c1673 Ogilby-Moxon map, A New Discription of Carolina..., the so-called First Lords Proprietors’ map. “Lockwoods Folly” is seen on the c1673-75 A New Map of the English Plantations in America…, by Robert Morden and William Berry, and “Lockwood Folley” is found on the 1682 Gascoyne map of Carolina, the so-called Second Lords Proprietors’ map. Lockwood Folly remains a regular, if not constant, place name on North Carolina maps from that point forward to current times.

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Let’s talk turkey

Welcome to the William P. Cumming Map Society’s new blog: the North Carolina Map Blog.  We hope to be posting every few weeks or so, and hope to have it set up eventually to make use of all those newfangled things like Twitter and RSS feeds. Your comments are appreciated, as long as they are civil! Continue reading