The mysteries of William Churton and his map of North Carolina

William Churton (1710 – c1767/8) was one of the pre-eminent surveyors in North Carolina during the 18th century. Unfortunately, very little is known about him.  He was born in London on April 5, 1710. He was in North Carolina by 1749, but when he arrived is unknown. His professional career in North Carolina predominantly pertained to surveying tracts of land in the Granville District. At the time of his death (late 1767 or early 1768), William Churton had nearly completed a map of North Carolina. Circumstances of Churton’s death and the fate of his manuscript map remain mysteries to us. Continue reading

Anniversary of the Mouzon-Delarochette map of the Carolinas

Happy Birthday, “Mouzon” Map!

Today marks the 240th anniversary of the publication of a map that was not made by Henry Mouzon, Jr.  One of the most recognized colonial era maps of North Carolina is the so-called Mouzon map, first published in May 1775. It is a beautifully executed map, entitled An Accurate Map of North and South Carolina with their Indian frontiers, Shewing in a distinct manner [all sorts of neat stuff], the whole from actual surveys by Henry Mouzon and Others. Continue reading

Murder in North Carolina! What’s in a name?

 

Several 18th century maps depict Murder in North Carolina. Continue reading

Re-Stating the 1770 Churton-Collet map of North Carolina

This beautiful late colonial (1770) map of North Carolina, by William Churton and John Collet, is one of our great cartographic treasures. I have been unable to find a description of the different states of the Churton-Collet map, and have assumed that there was only one state of:
A compleat map of North-Carolina from an actual survey / by Capt’n Collet, Governor of Fort Johnston ; engraved by I. Bayly. Continue reading