NC cartobibliography: Anthony Finley

The 1820s saw the maturation of cartographic publishing in the United States, heralding the “Golden Age of American Cartography”.1  Atlas publishers in the first years of this era included, Carey & Lea, Fielding Lucas, Henry Tanner, and Anthony Finley.

1824 map of North Carolina published by Anthony Finley

Image courtesy of David Rumsey

The above map of North Carolina was published in the 1824 first edition of Anthony Finley’s A New General Atlas Comprising a Complete Set of MapsContinue reading

North Carolina maps in Fielding Lucas atlases

Fielding Lucas Jr. first advertised an “Elegant New Atlas” as published and for sale on 10 February 1814, claiming, “There being now no other genuine Modern Atlas of the United States, nor any other likely to be had for some time to come –“.[1] He was half correct. Continue reading

Carey’s Pocket Atlas Maps of North Carolina

The Pocket Atlas Maps of North Carolina published by Mathew Carey, 1796-1820.

Mathew Carey published his first “Carey’s American Pocket Atlas” in 1796. The engraved plate for this map of North Carolina was used in later issues of Carey’s pocket atlas in 1801, 1802, 1805, 1806, and 1810. Updates to the plate appeared with the 1801 and 1805 editions of Carey’s pocket atlas. Continue reading

What map is this? Burr or Greenleaf?

In “What map is this?” Part 1 and Part 2, cartobibliographic resources useful in identification of North Carolina maps were discussed. In this segment, we’ll provide all the nitty-gritty details needed to correctly identify and date a series of 19th century atlas maps of “North & South Carolina” (ignoring the awful grammar inherent to that map title). Continue reading

What map is this? NC Canals are key

Do you ever find yourself staring at an old map and wondering, “Where on earth did this map come from?”  That question was recently prompted by a small undated map with no publisher imprint. The map is titled N. & S. CAROLINA and GEORGIA.1826-NCSCGA-ArmroydCareyLea

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Cape Fear & Yadkin Rail Road: NC’s first….or not.

If you believe the map, the Cape Fear & Yadkin Rail Road was the first railroad completed within the state of North Carolina.

From David Rumsey Collection.

From David Rumsey Collection.

The map was wrong. Continue reading

Anniversary of the Mouzon-Delarochette map of the Carolinas

Happy Birthday, “Mouzon” Map!

Today marks the 240th anniversary of the publication of a map that was not made by Henry Mouzon, Jr.  One of the most recognized colonial era maps of North Carolina is the so-called Mouzon map, first published in May 1775. It is a beautifully executed map, entitled An Accurate Map of North and South Carolina with their Indian frontiers, Shewing in a distinct manner [all sorts of neat stuff], the whole from actual surveys by Henry Mouzon and Others. Continue reading

Nonexistent North Carolina Maps

or, North Carolina Maps You’ll Never See

 

MITCHELL

A recent listing on eBay reminded me of the neglect frequently paid to North Carolina by map publishers in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The eBay listing was for a “Tourist’s Pocket Map of South Carolina”, by S. Augustus Mitchell. 1836 South Carolina pocket map by S. Augustus Mitchell

Would you like to see a copy of Mitchell’s “Tourist’s Pocket Map of North Carolina”? Continue reading

George Washington’s TripTik®

George Washington’s upcoming birthday and a recently spotted highway historical marker pertaining to his Southern Tour in 1791 prompted a search for contemporary (to Washington) maps showing the President’s route through North Carolina. What did we find? Continue reading

An unrecorded map of North Carolina

Given the lack of a useful cartobibiliography for post-Revolutionary War maps of North Carolina, one shouldn’t be too surprised to find a previously unrecorded map. Nonetheless, the recent discovery of a previously unknown first state of an 1814 map of North Carolina generated some excitement from this blogger. Continue reading

Map Wars IV: The Minister Strikes Back

In earlier blog posts, we’ve discussed the resurrection of the plates for the 1833 MacRae-Brazier map and their use by Wellington Williams to publish a “new” map of North Carolina in 1854. The following episode involved their use by an unknown publisher (J.H. French?) for a bizarre map that turned out to be a publisher’s mock up for the map that is the subject of today’s post. What does a minister have to do with all of this?

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Map Wars: Episode II – A “new” NC wall map.

There are, of course, numerous examples of maps whose publication history far outlived their accuracy from either a physical or political geographic perspective. One of the best examples from North Carolina is the 1833 MacRae-Brazier map.

Braziergif

1833 MacRae-Brazier map of North Carolina

Note: Analogous to the Star Wars movies, we’re starting in the middle of the story. We’ll eventually circle around to Episode I, the story of the original MacRae-Brazier map. The fact that I’m starting in the middle of the story is what prompted the post title; this mid 19th century commercial cartographic competition did not involve light sabres or other weaponry. We now return you to your regularly scheduled blog post… Continue reading