Bird’s eye views of North Carolina towns

Bird’s eye views are one of the most attractive map forms. They were most popular during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They are particularly fascinating because their creation more often relied on the ingenuity of the artist cartographer than on an actual view from upon high. Continue reading “Bird’s eye views of North Carolina towns”

Mayodan – a mill town born in the wilderness

Mayodan – a mill town born in the wilderness, Posted on 28 April 2020 by crmaps . This is the second of two posts in the past two years that completely vanished from this blog a few months after being posted; even the image files for this post disappeared from the blog’s media library page. If anyone has an explanation, or even better, a preventive cure, please share via the “What’s on your mind?” comment box near the bottom of this page.

In the 1890s, the town of Mayodan developed almost overnight on the Mayo River in western Rockingham County, NC. A map dating from the founding of this town was recently brought to my attention by Michael Buehler, proprietor of Boston Rare Maps. Continue reading “Mayodan – a mill town born in the wilderness”

Treasures of the Moravian Archives – E. A. Vogler’s 1863 Map of Forsyth County

Hidden in Plain Sight – some remarkable maps of Wachovia/Forsyth County/Winston-Salem

A few months ago, I attended a lecture at the Moravian Archives in Winston-Salem. While there, I had the opportunity to see several manuscript and printed maps of Forsyth County displayed on the walls of the Archives. Continue reading “Treasures of the Moravian Archives – E. A. Vogler’s 1863 Map of Forsyth County”

Early North Carolina school maps

It’s August, which means most of us are thinking about the start of school, even those of us who aren’t in school as students or teachers (think traffic). Let’s take a look at a few very scarce 19th Century published school maps of North Carolina. Continue reading “Early North Carolina school maps”

Cape Fear map mug

The June 9, 1868, issue of The Daily Journal (Wilmington, NC) includes an interesting story on page 3, pertaining to a map of Cape Fear on a mug.

The Daily Journal, Wilmington, NC, 9 June 1868, Tuesday, page 3:

A RELIC.– We have before us a most interesting relic of the past, surrounded with peculiar importance because of its interest being of a strictly local character. This relic is an old English earthen mug, equal in capacity to a quart measure, bearing upon its outside face, “a map of Cape Fear River and its vicinity from the Frying Pan Shoals to Wilmington; by actual survey.” This mug was given to the late Mr. Junius Davis, of Brunswick County, 10 years ago by one Miss Faulkes, an old maiden lady, whose family had owned it for 70 years previous to that time. There was also in the possession of the Faulkes family another mug, similar in shape and appearance, bearing a map showing the river above Wilmington, which was unfortunately broken. Continue reading “Cape Fear map mug”

What’s in a name? Conetoe, NC

Conetoe: A small but wonderful community in eastern Edgecombe County, about 6 miles southeast of Tarboro.

First, let’s get the pronunciation correct; it’s cuh-NEAT-uh, according to the NC Gazetteer. Don’t even think about pronouncing it Cone Toe. Ok, I’ll confess, I can’t help but think “Cone Toe” when I see Conetoe. It sure would help if they would revert to the original spelling. What is the source of this town’s unusual name? Continue reading “What’s in a name? Conetoe, NC”

NC cartobibliography: Anthony Finley

The 1820s saw the maturation of cartographic publishing in the United States, heralding the “Golden Age of American Cartography”.1  Atlas publishers in the first years of this era included, Carey & Lea, Fielding Lucas, Henry Tanner, and Anthony Finley.

1824 map of North Carolina published by Anthony Finley
Image courtesy of David Rumsey

The above map of North Carolina was published in the 1824 first edition of Anthony Finley’s A New General Atlas Comprising a Complete Set of MapsContinue reading “NC cartobibliography: Anthony Finley”

James T. Paterson – Confederate dentist and map publisher

This map of NC/SC, with a curious imprint, “Published by James T. Paterson”, contains no date or place of publication.

James T. Paterson 1865 map of North and South Carolina
Image courtesy of the State Archives, Raleigh, NC.

Continue reading “James T. Paterson – Confederate dentist and map publisher”

North Carolina maps in Fielding Lucas atlases

Fielding Lucas Jr. first advertised an “Elegant New Atlas” as published and for sale on 10 February 1814, claiming, “There being now no other genuine Modern Atlas of the United States, nor any other likely to be had for some time to come –“.[1] He was half correct. Continue reading “North Carolina maps in Fielding Lucas atlases”

Carey’s Pocket Atlas Maps of North Carolina

The Pocket Atlas Maps of North Carolina
published by Mathew Carey, 1796-1820.

Mathew Carey published his first “Carey’s American Pocket Atlas” in 1796. The engraved plate for this map of North Carolina was used in later issues of Carey’s pocket atlas in 1801, 1802, 1805, 1806, and 1810. Updates to the plate appeared with the 1801 and 1805 editions of Carey’s pocket atlas. Continue reading “Carey’s Pocket Atlas Maps of North Carolina”

What map is this? Burr or Greenleaf?

In “What map is this?” Part 1 and Part 2, cartobibliographic resources useful in identification of North Carolina maps were discussed. In this segment, we’ll provide all the nitty-gritty details needed to correctly identify and date a series of 19th century atlas maps of “North & South Carolina” (ignoring the awful grammar inherent to that map title). Continue reading “What map is this? Burr or Greenleaf?”

What map is this? NC Canals are key

NC Canals… Do you ever find yourself staring at an old map and wondering, “Where on earth did this map come from?”  That question was recently prompted by a small undated map with no publisher imprint. The map is titled N. & S. CAROLINA and GEORGIA.1826-NCSCGA-ArmroydCareyLea

Continue reading “What map is this? NC Canals are key”